THIS WEEK’S WRAP UP

This week on SARS wars

If the SARS controversy is an itchy political bite, the South African media has only been able to scratch around it: the nature of the venom is still under dispute. But, possibly, threatened by SARS investigations are supposed-to-be-untouchable government players, including Mr. President (who, by the way, looks like he’s escaping corruption charges linked to the spy tapes). The thing is, regardless of the nature of the allegations against the ‘rogue’ unit, the hawks are not actually authorized to investigate it. 

 

The Oscar (Pistorius) finale

The Constitutional Court has denied Oscar’s application to appeal his Supreme Court of Appeal murder sentence – Oscar’s last shot at slowing his propulsion toward the high court in Pretoria for sentencing this month.

 

The apparently unstoppable trump torpedo

The Republicans’ homegrown Frankenstein flip-flopped on toward nomination, his seemingly indestructible brand handing him a solid lead on Cruz (329 delegates won so far compared to 231), despite fact-backed attacks on all fronts. It seems the Orange Menace is a liar and fraud even by fellow Republican Mitt Romney’s rather unremarkable standards. Meanwhile, front-runner Hilary Clinton faces tough competition from Sanders in the Democratic nomination race.

 

North Korea gives the UN the middle finger

After firing short-range missiles into the Sea of Japan in a show of strategic ‘up yours’ to the UN, North Korea announced on Friday that it’s entering ‘preemptive attack mode.’ This is in response to harsh new sanctions approved on Wednesday night: a collective expression of anger at NK’s recent nuclear weapons tests (recall the recent explosion deemed too small to be hydrogen bomb, but too large to be conventional).

 

Pawns in the Brexit

France is using the thousands of refugees at its borders as pawns in a chess game to keep Britain in the European Nation. The country has threatened to remove border controls if UK voters look to back out of the troubled alliance. The UK’s exit would deliver a powerful roundhouse kick to the EU’s economic stability.

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